When Does A Penis Stop Growing?

Every guy wonders how things are growing “down-there” at some point in their life. So, here’s the scoop for any guy who’s wondering whether his penis is growing normally.

Just like other parts of the body, a normal penis comes in all sizes. And how a penis looks changes at different stages of a guy’s life. Someone who is 10 years old will look a lot different than someone who’s 19.

Normal development can occur at different times. Some boys enter puberty as early as 9. Others may not start developing until 14-15, or even later. The age at which the penis starts to grow varies considerably from guy to guy. It all depends on the age he enters puberty.

Changes in penis size are just one part of puberty, but the entire body is actually changing, including pubic hair, scrotum and testicular growth, muscle development, and a growth spurt in height. Some guys reach full maturity a little later, but even late-bloomers will catch-up.

At What Age Does a Penis Stop Growing?

The penis stops growing at the end of puberty, which varies from guy to guy. Typically this is by age 16-17, when the penis has reached its full adult size.

Everyone develops at their own pace though, so you may take longer or shorter time to finish puberty than your friends.

What is a Normal Size for a Penis?

Penises come in all shapes, sizes, and colors, so there is no such thing as an normal penis. Some penises are shorter and wider, some longer and skinny, some lean left, some lean right — all that variation is completely normal.

Ultimately the final size of your penis depends on your genetic makeup, just like the size of your feet, height, and eye color.

If you are wondering about your development, don’t try to compare yourself with your friend or your older brother — they are most likely at a different stage of development than you are anyway.

The important thing to remember is that it’s OK for you to be different from the guy at the next urinal.

What Can I Do to Increase the Size of My Penis?

Despite all the myths out there you may hear or read, a guy actually can’t change the size of his penis. Exercise, special diets, or vitamins do not make the penis grow faster or bigger.

Remember, the size of your penis has nothing to do with sexual ability or manliness.  Seriously, guys worry about penis size WAY too much. When it comes it penises, viva la difference!

Growing up isn’t easy, so if you ever have any concerns about your penis or sexual health, be sure to speak with a trusted person, like an older brother, parent, or your doctor.

How Does a Penis Change During Puberty?

During puberty, boys go through five stages of development known as the Tanner stages.  While every boy goes through these stages, there is a broad range of normal age for each stage.  Boys shouldn’t worry if they reach a stage of puberty earlier or later.

Tanner stage one: Before Puberty

This stage is often called pre-pubertal, meaning before the onset of puberty.

Tanner stage two: Pubic Hair Appears

In boys, puberty usually starts at around 11.5 years of age, although it can occur anytime between 10 and 15.

  • Pubic hair appears, though sparse and soft
  • Scrotum and testes begin to enlarge and redden
  • Penis has not begun to grow

Tanner stage three:  Growth Rate Begins

In boys, this stage usually begins around the age of 12.5.

  • Pubic hair curls and darkens
  • Penis begins to enlarge, by length at first
  • Acne may appear
  • Voice changes and cracks

Tanner stage four:  Growth Spurt of Penis

This stage usually starts at the age of 13-14 for boys, though the age varies significantly based on when puberty began.

  • Pubic hair becomes adult-like, but covers less area
  • Penis growth occurs rapidly
  • Testes and scrotum enlarge further and darken

Tanner stage five: Penis Stops Growing

This final stage of puberty usually occurs at just over 16 years of age, with 16-18 years old an average range.  Typically, this is about about 5-6 years after puberty began.  Genitals and pubic hair are now fully developed at the end of this stage.

Read More…